Future Curious

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futurescope:

The cute side of the robocalypse: Balancing robots from Japan

muRata manufacturing wants to cheer people up with its latest balancing machine. It’s part of a group of swarm robots, called the murata cheerleaders. But it’s not exactly clear what they’re cheering for.

(via emergentfutures)

futurescope:

Robotic Fabric Could Usher in New Era of Soft Robotics

Researchers from Purdue University are developing a robotic fabric with woven sensors that moves and contracts. It could lead to active clothing and a new class of soft robotics.


  Such an elastic technology could make possible robots that have sensory skin, stretchable robotic garments that people might wear for added strength and endurance, “g-suits” for pilots or astronauts to counteract the effects of acceleration, and lightweight, versatile robots to roam alien landscapes during space missions.
  
  The robotic fabric is a cotton material containing sensors made of a flexible polymer and threadlike strands of a shape-memory alloy that return to a coiled shape when heated, causing the fabric to move.


(just think about malfunctions…)

[read more]

futurescope:

Robotic Fabric Could Usher in New Era of Soft Robotics

Researchers from Purdue University are developing a robotic fabric with woven sensors that moves and contracts. It could lead to active clothing and a new class of soft robotics.

Such an elastic technology could make possible robots that have sensory skin, stretchable robotic garments that people might wear for added strength and endurance, “g-suits” for pilots or astronauts to counteract the effects of acceleration, and lightweight, versatile robots to roam alien landscapes during space missions.

The robotic fabric is a cotton material containing sensors made of a flexible polymer and threadlike strands of a shape-memory alloy that return to a coiled shape when heated, causing the fabric to move.

(just think about malfunctions…)

[read more]

(via emergentfutures)

futurescope:

Wearable Artificial Kidney: first U.S. clinical trial

Dr. Jonathan Himmelfarb, a UW Medicine nephrologist, gives context to the first clinical trial of the Wearable Artificial Kidney, a device intended to ease dialysis for people with end-stage renal disease. The trial will be conducted at UW Medical Center in Seattle.

[read more]

futurist-foresight:

Zoobotics produces a modular robotics kit worth watching.

futurescope:

Zoobotics is developing modular animal-like robots made from paper, wood or plastics that can be assembled with a few tools

A startup from Hamburg (Germany) is experimenting with tetra- and hexapods, made from cardboard and paper. All technical functions are controlled by an Arduino Uno. Estimated base price incl all parts and reusable components atm around 300 €. They’re aiming for a crowdfunding release at the end of 2014. Count me in.

Description of Zuri 01:

ZURI is a programmable robot made from paper and grey cardboard. This motion machine, conceived of as a kit, can be assembled with a few tools (cutter, ruler, cutting mat, bone folder, glue and screwdriver). In addition to a distance sensor, the Paper Robot has servo motors, servo controllers and a Bluetooth module for wireless control via PC or smartphone.

ZURI is a modular robotic system. It is based on two leg variants (2DOF / 3DOF) and two different body modules (1M / 2M). The combination of leg and body modules allows for a lot of robot variations. This results in different degrees of difficulty regarding programming and coordination of the running gaits.

The ZURI-PAPERBOT-SYSTEM combines disciplines such as modeling, the use of electronics and programming. It is perfect for use in the classroom.

[Zoobotics] [long feature in german on golem] [all pictures by zoobotics]

futurescope:

Search & Rescue Robot: Hybrid zoobot can travel by air or land

Scientist from University of Pennsylvania Mod Lab team have developed a snake drone-quadcopter, called H.E.R.A.L.D. (Hybrid Exploration Robot for Air and Land Deployment).

“Snakes on a plane” might be a good strategy for building rescue robots. A four-propeller helicopter can carry a wheeled snakelike robot through the air, or connect with two snakebots to speed over flat terrain. On their own, the snakebots can squeeze through a 4-inch tube, drive over gravel and climb stairs. The helicopter can also quickly bring a bot up a flight of stairs. Pairing two snakelike robots with a flying one has let researchers combine the exploring skills of small, ground-based bots with the swift moves of an aerial machine.

Engineers have created search-and-rescue robots before — tanklike machines with heavy-duty treads — but most of these bots muscle over rough terrain with brute force. They can disturb damaged areas and have trouble reaching nooks and crannies within the wreckage.

Read the full story on sciencenews.org: http://ow.ly/BPDCH

[H.E.R.A.L.D.]

futurescope:

The Rochester “Invisibility” Cloack

Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered a way to hide large objects from sight using inexpensive (less than $100) and readily available lenses.

invisible cloak

Snip from Reuters:

The so-called Rochester Cloak is not really a tangible cloak at all. Rather the device looks like equipment used by an optometrist. When an object is placed behind the layered lenses it seems to disappear.

Previous cloaking methods have been complicated, expensive, and not able to hide objects in three dimensions when viewed at varying angles, they say.

"From what, we know this is the first cloaking device that provides three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking," said Joseph Choi, a graduate student who helped develop the method at Rochester, which is renowned for its optical research.

In their tests, the researchers have cloaked a hand, a face, and a ruler – making each object appear “invisible” while the image behind the hidden object remains in view. The implications for the discovery are endless, they say.

"I imagine this could be used to cloak a trailer on the back of a semi-truck so the driver can see directly behind him," Choi said. "It can be used for surgery, in the military, in interior design, art."

Don’t miss the behind-the-pysics video from University Rochester: How Does Cloaking Work in the Real World?

[read more] [Rochester Quantum Optics Lab]
[Want to make your own? Here’s a tutorial] [picture by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester]

(via emergentfutures)